The Crew

 

Patience’s crew are Jakob, Paul and Daniel. Three guys who have turned their lives inside out and upside down to follow a dream. The dream is a dedication to adventure by immersing their lives in searching for and discovering remote mountain and ocean scapes in their pristine forms. Treks and Tracks, as a business, is their vision and vehicle for sharing these experiences with others. This is the reason this very sailing  journey exists.

The expedition is committed to searching for remote surf breaks and enjoying the wonders of the eastern pacific coastline. As Patience’s crew, Jakob, Paul and Daniel collectively hold this dream close to their hearts.

 

 

 

 

But they are also individuals (who do most things together):

 

Jakob Laggner

Dreaming of new places to travel and adventurous expeditions to conduct is easy for most. It is the act of materializing them that is difficult. Jakob has the unstoppable ability to create and materialize what for most would only be a day dream. A modern day visionary, he has been the driving force behind the expedition and Treks and Tracks as a whole.

Even though we always brainstorm new ideas together, Jakob is usually the one that pushes them the furthest. It’ll then seem like a crazy idea, and we’ll just grin and say ‘alright let’s do it’ and it’ll really happen!”

Daniel


 

Jakob winching off the coast of California

 

When not sailing or surfing, Joshua Tree is one of Jakob’s favorite places to climb. This is him on a route called “Chube”

 

 

One of the reasons Santa Cruz is one of Jakob’s homes is the close proximity to amazing surf. This is 4 mile on a fun day.

 

 

Jakob riding Stormy on our latest Colorado expedition last summer (2010), leading a pack horse.

 

 

 

Daniel Laggner

Daniel is a veritable encyclopedia of the natural world.  A born teacher, he loves nothing more than sharing this knowledge with those around him, adding invaluable depth to their experience outdoors. With years of experience as a climbing instructor and coach along with his field science background he sets the standard of how Treks and Tracks contributes knowledge during courses and expeditions.

 

Daniel on Patience, as the crew passed the scenic coast of Big Sur, early on in their expedition.

 

 

Climbing cracks and Alpine routes are Daniel’s favorite aspects of the sport. This is one of the many brilliant Yosemite cracks, climbed last summer (2010).

 

 

Daniel truly feels at home and in his element during the horse rides in the mountains. This is Sox (left) and Twister (right) during the ride in September 2009.

 

 

Riding a perfect shoulder high in remote Bahia Santa Maria in late February 2011.

 

 

 

 

 

Paul Mangasarian

A man of many talents, Paul brings a myriad of valuable skills to the expedition. Though he would rather be getting barreled, he can whip up spreadsheets and crunch numbers as easily as standing on his hands. An outdoor athlete with bottomless stoke and energy, he is always pushing the rest of the crew into the physical challenges of surfing and climbing. He is a talented writer and photographer as well as business man. Be it boat engine repair, video editing  or eight foot barrels, no challenge is too much for him.

 

On top of a small peak in Bahia Santa Maria. Only a small white speck in the distance, Patience silently sits alone at her anchor, as Paul happily points out.

 

 

 

When it comes to climbing, Paul is fearless. This is a notoriously high boulder problem in Joshua Tree called “White Rastafarian”.

 

 

Paul charging a barrel in G-land Indonesia back in 2007.

 

 

Though Alpine climbing is fairly new to Paul, he takes naturally to it, using a combination of good judgement and high speed. This is him after a successful climb in Tuolumne Meadows, Yosemite.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 comment for “The Crew

  1. andy miller
    May 15, 2011 at 7:44 pm

    I really like your site. Cant wait to see you all again. I hope to ride with you guys if there is room. Let me know if that works for you. Im a good camp cook!

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